Happy Anniversary, Green Earth Book Award

Washashore-front-cover.jpgWe congratulate the Green Earth Book Awards on 10 Years of honoring environmental children’s literature and their donation this year of 10,000 environmental books with a message of stewardship to area schools!

Phil Hoose was pleased to join the celebrations on two previous years when they honored his books, Hey, Litte Ant and Moonbird.

“Being able to deliver engaging material about the environment in such a big way is a perfect representation of our first decade of success,” said Ian Kline, chairman of the board. “We’ve engaged thousands of students with books, outdoor classrooms, and even a student-designed nature trail. The impact is incredible – we’ve seen children of all ages embrace environmental responsibility through our programs.”

The 2014 winners are:

Jennifer O’Connell – The Eye of the Whale a Rescue Story (picture book)

Kathi Appelt – The True Blue Scouts of Sugar Man Swamp (children’s fiction)

Suzanne Goldsmith, Washashore (young adult fiction)

Melissa Stewart and Higgins Bond – A Place for Turtles (children’s nonfiction)

Teena Ruark Gorrow and Craig A. Koppie– Inside a Bald Eagle’s Nest: A Photographic Journey Through the American Bald Eagle Nesting Season (young adult nonfiction)

Little Free Libraries

Look! Hey Little Ant popped up in a Little Free Library the other day.

HEY LITTLE ANT in a Little Free Library

HEY LITTLE ANT in a Little Free Library

The Little Free Library movement started in Wisconsin  and has spread all over the world.  It’s a “take a book, return a book” gathering place where neighbors share their favorite literature and stories. In its most basic form, a Little Free Library is a box full of books where anyone may stop by and pick up a book (or two) and bring back another book to share.

 

Moonbird Honored with Green Earth Award

Phil Hoose & Reader at Green Earth Books Award 2009

Phil Hoose & Reader at Green Earth Books Award 2009

Phillip Hoose has been once again honored with a Green Earth Book Award. The award is the nation’s first environmental stewardship book award for children and young adult books. Over 80 winning and honor books have been honored since 2005 including Hoose’s Hey, Little Ant and The Race to Save the Lord God Bird.

“One of the beauties of the Earth Book Award is that it recognizes an author who’s writing about a topic that is of vital importance to our Earth, yet it’s an area that, until recently, received little attention.” –Pam Spencer Holley, author of the American Library Association’s Quick and Popular Reads for Teens

Congratulations to all the winning and honor books!

Staying Power of an Aesop Fable

Author Mary Pipher

Phillip and Hannah Hoose’s picture book, Hey, Little Ant is included in Mary Pipher’s forthcoming book, The Green Boat: Reviving Ourselves in Our Capsized Culture, her look at the psychological and cultural factors that keep us from facing our enormous global perils, mainly global climate change.

“This delightful book has the staying power of an Aesop fable. Children and adults love this story which helps develop the moral imagination and teaches an appreciation of point of view.

If our world changes for the better, it will be because of books like Hey, Little Ant.” –Mary Pipher

Mary, thank you for all you do to make this a better planet.

Hey Nemala!

Thank you to Flashlight Press for telling us about the appearance of Hey, Little Ant in an Israeli children’s wildlife magazine called Iton Chai.

Hey Nemala! is a funny, book that provokes thought through an entertaining discussion between two creatures, large and small. The book encourages children to formulate opinions about animals, peer pressure, and ways to deal with violence. What does the boy decide? To find out, you’ll have to read the book. Amazing illustrations by Debbie Tilley emphasize the conflict between large and small.”

The Examined Life, Age 8

Bryce Vickmark for The New York Times

There was a wonderful piece in the New York Times on Prof. Thomas E. Wartenberg teaching of philosophy to children through children’s books. You can read the full article, “Examined Life, Age 8″ here.

“The world is a puzzling place and when you’re young it doesn’t make sense,” Professor Wartenberg says. “What you’re giving them is the sort of skills to learn how to think about these things.”

We thank Prof. Thomas E. Wartenberg for using Hey, Little Ant in his fine curriculum alongside such great books as The Giving Tree, Morris the Moose, and Frog and Toad Together.

I Speak for the Trees

Dawn Armstrong of the Lake Tahoe Humane Society and SPCA put together an ‘animal story starter,’ a list of children’s books that “nurture compassion, responsibility and respect.”  Hey, Little Ant is honored to be on the list with so many other important books.

Where would any of us be, for example, without Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax?  In honor of Dawn’s fine work, let us greet the New Year with two favorite quotes from The Lorax.

Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not. –Dr. Seuss, The Lorax

I speak for the trees, for the trees have no tongues. –Dr. Seuss, The Lorax